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Who We Are

The Ammonia Energy Association is the global agent of collective action for the ammonia energy industry by creating, collecting, organizing, and disseminating relevant knowledge for the responsible use of ammonia in a sustainable energy economy. 

Originally, our work consisted of convincing people that ammonia could be used for energy at all. Now, companies and governments across the globe are analyzing ammonia within their portfolio of clean energy technologies. 

A greater challenge confronts us as we aim to accelerate the pace at which clean ammonia energy is created. We are scaling up our work to match the technological readiness, political necessity, social imperative, and commercial opportunity for ammonia energy. 

Join us and help us accelerate the adoption of clean ammonia energy within a sustainable energy economy.

Membership

Our member companies span the full value chain of ammonia energy, from decarbonized hydrogen and ammonia production, through safety and distribution, to power generation and  energy storage. 

What connects all of these companies is an interest in the use of ammonia in a sustainable energy economy.

Conference

The Ammonia Energy Conference offers attendees the opportunity to learn from and network with key technology and project developers.

Beyond presenting the latest technical information, the event ultimately aims to accelerate the adoption of ammonia in a sustainable energy economy, with additional programming exclusively for AEA Members, and with the workshops of the Implementation Conference focused on setting the agenda for the Ammonia Energy Association moving forward.

Latest Articles

Monash team publishes Ammonia Economy Roadmap

Earlier this month, Doug MacFarlane and his team of researchers at Monash University published A Roadmap to the Ammonia Economy in the journal Joule. The paper charts an evolution of ammonia synthesis “through multiple generations of technology development and scale-up.” It provides a clear assessment of “the increasingly diverse range of applications of ammonia as a fuel that is emerging,” and concludes with perspectives on the “broader scale sustainability of an ammonia economy,” with emphasis on the Nitrogen Cycle.

The Roadmap is brilliant in its simple distillation of complex and competing technology developments across decades. It assesses the sustainability and scalability of three generations of ammonia synthesis technologies. Put simply, Gen1 is blue ammonia, Gen2 is green ammonia, and Gen3 is electrochemical ammonia. It also outlines the amount of research and development required before each could be broadly adopted (“commercial readiness”). The paper thus provides vital clarity on the role that each generation of technology could play in the energy transition, and the timing at which it could make its impact.

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Ammonia, Hydrogen P2X2P Demonstrations Slated for Europe

At this early point in the energy transition, many groups are formulating big-picture concepts for the design of a sustainable energy economy, and many more are developing discrete technologies that will be relevant as the transition advances. The multi-stakeholder H2020 European project known as “FLEXibilize combined cycle power plant through Power-to-X solutions using non-CONventional Fuels” (FLEXnCONFU) is coming from a different direction. Its premise is that construction of a bridge to the future should start now, and should be anchored in aspects of the current energy system that are likely to endure over the long-term.

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Green ammonia plant proposed for Orkney

Eneus Energy recently announced that it intends to build a green ammonia plant in Orkney, Scotland. Eneus describes itself as a “project developer and technology integrator for green ammonia,” and this announcement marks the first public disclosure of a site from its “portfolio” of projects under development.

Orkney has been a net energy exporter since 2013, with wind, tidal, and wave energy generation far exceeding local demand; the islands have also been producing green hydrogen for some years.

If this latest project moves ahead, the 11 ton per day green ammonia plant would be powered by two new wind turbines, each of 4.2 MW capacity, expanding the existing Hammars Hill wind farm and providing the island with a scalable solution for renewable energy storage and distribution that does not require grid transmission.

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