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Who We Are

The Ammonia Energy Association is the global agent of collective action for the ammonia energy industry by creating, collecting, organizing, and disseminating relevant knowledge for the responsible use of ammonia in a sustainable energy economy. 

Originally, our work consisted of convincing people that ammonia could be used for energy at all. Now, companies and governments across the globe are analyzing ammonia within their portfolio of clean energy technologies. 

A greater challenge confronts us as we aim to accelerate the pace at which clean ammonia energy is created. We are scaling up our work to match the technological readiness, political necessity, social imperative, and commercial opportunity for ammonia energy. 

Join us and help us accelerate the adoption of clean ammonia energy within a sustainable energy economy.

Membership

Our member companies span the full value chain of ammonia energy, from decarbonized hydrogen and ammonia production, through safety and distribution, to power generation and  energy storage. 

What connects all of these companies is an interest in the use of ammonia in a sustainable energy economy.

Conference

The Ammonia Energy Conference offers attendees the opportunity to learn from and network with key technology and project developers.

Beyond presenting the latest technical information, the event ultimately aims to accelerate the adoption of ammonia in a sustainable energy economy, with additional programming exclusively for AEA Members, and with the workshops of the Implementation Conference focused on setting the agenda for the Ammonia Energy Association moving forward.

Latest Articles

South Australia Planning Hydrogen Export Strategy

The state of South Australia earlier this month issued a tender for professional services under the title “Hydrogen Export Study, Modelling Tool and Prospectus.” The tender is a further step in the state’s campaign to become a major exporter of renewable energy in the form of green and/or blue hydrogen. The results of the study are expected to “inform key considerations such as locations for hydrogen production and export, volume of supply potential, the interdependencies of hydrogen supply chain infrastructure, and the landed cost of clean hydrogen exported from South Australia.”

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Literature Review: Ammonia as a Fuel for Compression Ignition Engines

The diesel engine, also known as the compression ignition (CI) engine, has been a workhorse of the modern energy economy for more than a hundred years. Its role in the coming sustainable energy economy will be determined by its ability to co-evolve with climate-friendly fuels. Two researchers from the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology in Japan have now examined the fit between ammonia and the CI engine.

Pavlos Dimitriou and Rahat Javaid arrive at a two-part conclusion in their paper, “A review of ammonia as a compression ignition engine fuel,” published in January in the International Journal of Hydrogen Energy. Part one is good news: “Ammonia as a compression ignition fuel can be currently seen as a feasible solution.” Part two is a dose of qualifying reality: to manage emissions of N2O, NOx, and unburnt NH3, “aftertreatment systems are mandatory for the adaptation of this technology,” which means that ammonia-fueled CI engines are likely to be feasible “only for marine, power generation and possibly heavy-duty applications where no significant space constraints exist.”

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Lloyd’s Register: how ammonia can be the ideal renewable marine fuel

We’ve recently reported a series of ammonia-fueled vessel development and demonstration projects led by industry consortia. One of these, in which Lloyd’s Register is joined by Samsung Heavy Industries, MISC, and MAN Energy Solutions, is developing “an ammonia-fuelled tanker.”

In an interview with Ship Technology magazine this month, Lloyd’s Register provided some new details about this project and added context for their ammonia-fueled vessel development plans.

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