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University of South Carolina

Paper

Material Discovery and Investigation of Novel Y Containing Ru Catalysts for Low Temperature Ammonia Decomposition

Liquid ammonia can be used as an alternative hydrogen carrier and can be decomposed over catalysts to create a high purity hydrogen stream for fuel cell applications. Ammonia decomposition is typically catalyzed using supported ruthenium catalysts. Current ruthenium catalysts are expensive and often require reaction temperatures of 650 °C to attain complete conversion [1]. For the hydrogen produced from ammonia decomposition to be efficiently used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells, operating temperatures need to be considerably lowered and effluent concentrations of ammonia need to be minimized to avoid poisoning of the membrane [2]. Therefore, it is of interest to…

Article

REFUEL Ammonia Use-Side Funding Awards

Six of the projects designated for funding by the ARPA-E REFUEL announcement on December 15 involve technologies on the use side of the ammonia energy space. Three focus on generating hydrogen from ammonia. Two focus on fuel cells that convert ammonia to electricity. One project involves both ammonia synthesis and use.

Article

REFUEL Ammonia Use-Side Funding Awards

Six of the projects designated for funding by the ARPA-E REFUEL announcement on December 15 involve technologies on the use side of the ammonia energy space. Three focus on generating hydrogen from ammonia. Two focus on fuel cells that convert ammonia to electricity. One project involves both ammonia synthesis and use.

Paper

Material Discovery and Investigation of Novel Y Containing Ru Catalysts for Low Temperature Ammonia Decomposition

Liquid ammonia can be used as an alternative hydrogen carrier and can be decomposed over catalysts to create a high purity hydrogen stream for fuel cell applications. Ammonia decomposition is typically catalyzed using supported ruthenium catalysts. Current ruthenium catalysts are expensive and often require reaction temperatures of 650 °C to attain complete conversion [1]. For the hydrogen produced from ammonia decomposition to be efficiently used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells, operating temperatures need to be considerably lowered and effluent concentrations of ammonia need to be minimized to avoid poisoning of the membrane [2]. Therefore, it is of interest to…