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Who We Are

The Ammonia Energy Association is the global agent of collective action for the ammonia energy industry by creating, collecting, organizing, and disseminating relevant knowledge for the responsible use of ammonia in a sustainable energy economy. 

Originally, our work consisted of convincing people that ammonia could be used for energy at all. Now, companies and governments across the globe are analyzing ammonia within their portfolio of clean energy technologies. 

A greater challenge confronts us as we aim to accelerate the pace at which clean ammonia energy is created. We are scaling up our work to match the technological readiness, political necessity, social imperative, and commercial opportunity for ammonia energy. 

Join us and help us accelerate the adoption of clean ammonia energy within a sustainable energy economy.

Membership

Our member companies span the full value chain of ammonia energy, from decarbonized hydrogen and ammonia production, through safety and distribution, to power generation and  energy storage. 

What connects all of these companies is an interest in the use of ammonia in a sustainable energy economy.

Conference

The Ammonia Energy Conference offers attendees the opportunity to learn from and network with key technology and project developers.

Beyond presenting the latest technical information, the event ultimately aims to accelerate the adoption of ammonia in a sustainable energy economy, with additional programming exclusively for AEA Members, and with the workshops of the Implementation Conference focused on setting the agenda for the Ammonia Energy Association moving forward.

Latest Articles

Green ammonia plant proposed for Orkney

Eneus Energy recently announced that it intends to build a green ammonia plant in Orkney, Scotland. Eneus describes itself as a “project developer and technology integrator for green ammonia,” and this announcement marks the first public disclosure of a site from its “portfolio” of projects under development.

Orkney has been a net energy exporter since 2013, with wind, tidal, and wave energy generation far exceeding local demand; the islands have also been producing green hydrogen for some years.

If this latest project moves ahead, the 11 ton per day green ammonia plant would be powered by two new wind turbines, each of 4.2 MW capacity, expanding the existing Hammars Hill wind farm and providing the island with a scalable solution for renewable energy storage and distribution that does not require grid transmission.

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CSIRO at Work on SOEC Technology

Earlier this month the on-line trade journal gasworld published an interview with CSIRO’s Ani Kulkarni that illuminated a research program focused on solid oxide electrolysis technology. The takeaway is that the CSIRO program is making progress that can, in Kulkarni’s words, “elevate this technology from the lab bench to become cost-effective at an industrial scale.”

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Methane splitting and turquoise ammonia

Most hydrogen today is produced from fossil fuels – steam methane reforming of natural gas, partial oxidation of coal or oil residues – and entails large CO2 emissions. This fossil hydrogen can be called “grey hydrogen”. Or sometimes, brown. The same color scheme applies to the ammonia produced from it, so we have “grey ammonia.” Or brown ammonia, your call. The exact carbon footprint depends on the fuel used and the efficiency of the facility, so you could easily identify many shades of grey.

There is, however, another option to deliver clean hydrogen – and now another colour: turquoise, or green-blue (or blue-green). This is the colour of hydrogen from methane pyrolysis, a process that directly splits methane into hydrogen and solid carbon. Instead of being a waste, like CO2, that must be disposed of safely, solid carbon is potentially a resource.

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