Article

Sunborne Systems & AFC Energy: successful ammonia cracker demonstrations

Sunborne Systems ran a successful demonstration for its ammonia cracking reactor in Oxford, producing a fuel blend capable of powering a small vehicle or small generator unit. Also in the UK, AFC Energy announced a similarly successful demonstration of its integrated cracker and purifier system, producing hydrogen fuel which meets purity & ISO standards for heavy vehicle refueling.

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Low-Carbon Fuels for Power Generation

The EPRI-GTI Low Carbon Resources Initiative (LCRI) has nine technical subcommittees.  The Power Generation subcommittee currently has 26 active members representing electric, gas and combined electric & gas utilities as well as two gas turbine Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM).  Studies, testing and demonstration projects utilizing hydrogen and ammonia as alternate low-carbon energy carriers dominates member interests with hydrogen being most significant. Next steps will include scoping specific topics for “no-regret” studies and soliciting inputs for creating a five-year power generation roadmap.  Current position of the power generation company members:   Alternate Energy Carrier (AEC). Applied R&D on H2 and H2…

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Starfire Energy’s ammonia cracking and cracked gas purification technology

Ammonia cracking is important for both combustion and fuel cell applications. Starfire Energy has verified that a blend of 70% ammonia + 30% cracked ammonia can burn well in a conventional natural gas burner with very low ammonia slip and acceptable NOx using a stoichiometric fuel-air mixture. A 10 MW turbine or internal combustion engine using such a blend will need about 1.44 tonnes of cracked ammonia per hour. Starfire Energy’s monolith-supported cracking catalyst may be ideally suited for this application. Fully cracked ammonia retains several thousand parts per million of ammonia due to thermodynamic limitations. Residual ammonia can damage…

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Ammonia for Power: a literature review

"Ammonia for Power" is an open-access literature review that includes over 300 citations for recent and ongoing research in the use of ammonia in engines, fuel cells, and turbines, as well as providing references to decades of historical case studies and publications. The review, written by a consortium of ammonia energy experts from the University of Cardiff, University of Oxford, the UK's Science and Technology Facilities Council, and Tsinghua University in China, can be found in the November 2018 edition of Progress in Energy and Combustion Science.