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Certifying renewable ammonia

The Smart Energy Council has established a world leading zero carbon certification for renewable hydrogen, renewable ammonia and renewable metals. This overview of the scheme will include results of the first project being certified under the scheme and the current pre-certification of the Yara renewable ammonia plant being built in the Pilbara, Western Australia.

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Highlights from the EU debate on H2 certification

Climate mitigation is key driver for H2 roadmaps and policies. Regulatory framework still in its infancy, but it will evolve dynamically. In 1st phase, H2 GHG emission (and other sustainability) standards must take into account the still high level of power sector emissions in EU and elsewhere, and the need to get the clean H2 market up and running. But in the medium term, GHG emission standards will get closer and closer to true climate neutrality. I personally would anticipate this and would not advise to make long term investments in “grey-green” or “grey-blue” H2 => It might be accepted…

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Hydrogen Certification

The ability for consumers to have certainty with regard to the origin of their energy products is crucial if Australia is to meet its potential to be a top exporter of clean hydrogen. The hydrogen industry is on a journey towards the development of a certification scheme to allow this. Alignment on key concepts and close engagement with the Federal Government has allowed the industry to progress towards a scheme which will meet the needs of producers and consumers. The process to date could provide a blueprint as ammonia producers embark on the same journey.

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The Ammonia Wrap: no major obstacles for NoGAPS success and more

Welcome to the Ammonia Wrap: a summary of all the latest announcements, news items and publications about ammonia energy. This week: latest report from NoGAPS, Viking Energy project takes another step, more collaborations for Yara, thyssenkrupp to invest in cracking R&D, investment in clean hydrogen technology in the USA, world-first visualisation of ammonia combustion in a spark-ignition engine and our numbers of the week.

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Ammonia Energy Live May: Origin Energy’s decarbonisation journey

This May we presented a new episode in our monthly webinar series: Ammonia Energy Live. Every month we’ll explore the wonderful world of ammonia energy and the role it will play in global decarbonisation - with an Australian twist. For May’s episode we welcomed Sarah Tincknell, Stakeholder and Regulatory Manager of the Future Fuels Division at Origin Energy. Sarah joined us to share some of the experiences and learnings Origin Energy has gone through on its decarbonisation journey to date, and give us some insights into what emissions reduction looks like at an electricity generator and retailer. And, of course, we wanted to find out where ammonia and hydrogen fit into Origin's long term plans for decarbonisation. Sarah was interviewed by Emily Heenan, (Process Engineer, also in the Future Fuels Division at Origin), and Jacinta Bakker (Senior Research Coordinator at Jupiter Ionics).

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Low Carbon Ammonia via Methane Pyrolysis

Splitting methane into hydrogen and carbon (methane pyrolysis) allows for the utilization of one of the largest energy reserves on our planet (natural gas) without emitting carbon dioxide, since only the hydrogen is oxidized to release energy, while the carbon is permanently sequesters as a solid product often replacing products that have their own GHG emissions. If you split biogenic methane (that produced from the anaerobic digestion of biomass), carbon dioxide is pulled out of the atmosphere resulting in a carbon negative process for making hydrogen (and in turn ammonia), and presenting a long term opportunity to begin drawing CO2…

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Building a sustainable industrial and energy infrastructure

Adjacent to its steel manufacturing plant in Duisburg, Germany thyssenkrupp has established multi-million dollar testing facility for different kinds of Carbon-2-Chem solutions using the offgases from blast furnaces and coke plants, cleaning and separating those gases into its different components and further processing the components to different chemical products such as ammonia and methanol. Major contributor is also the element hydrogen, which is produced in electrolysis unit based on thyssenkrupp’s Uhde technology. This testing facility focuses mainly on recycling the offgases to maximum extent resulting in most sustainable production processes.