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Low Carbon Ammonia via Methane Pyrolysis

Splitting methane into hydrogen and carbon (methane pyrolysis) allows for the utilization of one of the largest energy reserves on our planet (natural gas) without emitting carbon dioxide, since only the hydrogen is oxidized to release energy, while the carbon is permanently sequesters as a solid product often replacing products that have their own GHG emissions. If you split biogenic methane (that produced from the anaerobic digestion of biomass), carbon dioxide is pulled out of the atmosphere resulting in a carbon negative process for making hydrogen (and in turn ammonia), and presenting a long term opportunity to begin drawing CO2…

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Building a sustainable industrial and energy infrastructure

Adjacent to its steel manufacturing plant in Duisburg, Germany thyssenkrupp has established multi-million dollar testing facility for different kinds of Carbon-2-Chem solutions using the offgases from blast furnaces and coke plants, cleaning and separating those gases into its different components and further processing the components to different chemical products such as ammonia and methanol. Major contributor is also the element hydrogen, which is produced in electrolysis unit based on thyssenkrupp’s Uhde technology. This testing facility focuses mainly on recycling the offgases to maximum extent resulting in most sustainable production processes.

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Low Carbon Ammonia at Nutrien

Nutrien is currently a world leader in the production of low carbon Ammonia today. A market premium for low carbon ammonia is critical to spur investment and deployment of transformative technologies, which will not only provide low carbon Ammonia as a fuel, but support decarbonization of the fertilizer industry as well. The development of a forward-looking certification process, based on sound science, is critical to developing this market.

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Low-carbon ammonia in Nebraska and the Netherlands

Last week, two new low-carbon ammonia production projects were announced, both of them large-scale and largely CO2-free. Monolith Materials announced a 275,000 ton per year “clean ammonia” plant in Nebraska, in the heart of the US cornbelt. The plant will begin construction in 2021, expanding the existing demonstration plant, using Monolith’s methane pyrolysis process powered by 100% renewable electricity. Ørsted and Yara announced their plan to produce 75,000 tons per year of “green ammonia” at Yara’s existing Sluiskil plant in the Netherlands. They intend to install a 100 MW electrolyzer, using Ørsted’s offshore wind energy, with a final investment decision expected in 2021-2022, and production beginning in 2024-2025.

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The cost of hydrogen: Platts launches Hydrogen Price Assessment

What does hydrogen really cost? Apparently, there's now a good answer to this question. $0.7955 per kg. This is according to the new daily hydrogen price assessment launched yesterday by Platts. Price assessments like this are invaluable for thriving markets, supporting transparency and developing into the benchmarks and indexes that underpin investments, trade, and regulations. This is a welcome innovation from the universe of financial product development. It will be interesting to see how Platts's hydrogen prices evolve, in terms of the cost structure of hydrogen production, of course, but also from the perspective of ammonia energy. If the purpose is to support commodity trading, these price assessments must eventually expand to include hydrogen carriers — molecules, like ammonia, that can be stored and transported more economically than hydrogen itself — in other words, commoditized hydrogen.