Article

Unlocking CCS ammonia potential in Europe

The first episode of our new series Ammonia Project Features revealed interesting details about current and future low-carbon ammonia projects in Europe. Bjørgulf Eidesen (Horisont Energi) explained that the Barents Blue project aims to set an ambitious new standard for low-carbon ammonia production, particularly by demonstrating transparency on its CO2 footprint & other sustainability indicators. But, although Europe’s technical capacity for carbon storage is far greater than what will be required, Toby Lockwood (Clean Air Task Force) reminded us that progress is slow, with only half the capacity required by 2030 currently developed. Supporting policy, tight regulations and funding support is all required from a government level.

Article

Green Ammonia Volume Analysis – A Roadmap Towards 2030

Yara Clean Ammonia, together with NCE Maritime CleanTech and with analysis support from DNV, have delivered a volume analysis and roadmap for the use of renewable ammonia in the Norwegian domestic shipping sector. With the right policy levers in place, renewable ammonia can meet and reach beyond the 2030 decarbonisation targets for the Norwegian domestic fleet, reducing emissions by as much as 69%.

Article

Australia’s first gas-to-hydrogen pipeline transition to feed ammonia production near Perth

APA Group and Wesfarmers Chemicals, Energy and Fertilisers (WesCEF) have signed a new MoU to investigate the potential of feeding renewable hydrogen to existing ammonia production facilities in Kwinana, near Perth. Sections of APA’s existing Parmelia Gas Pipeline are being assessed for conversion to carry 100% hydrogen. If successful, the pipeline could become a “pure renewable hydrogen service”. In Kwinana, plans are already underway for multiple newbuild hydrogen & ammonia projects.

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DECHEMA and Fertilizers Europe: decarbonizing ammonia production up to 2030

DECHEMA and Fertilizers Europe recently released a new report detailing how & where the European fertilizer industry can decarbonize leading up to 2030. Technology options for CO2-emission reduction of hydrogen feedstock in ammonia production explores decarbonization pathways including energy efficiency improvements, carbon capture & sequestration, renewable hydrogen feedstock and grid-based electrolysis. It proposes a detailed roadmap towards 19% emissions reduction from the EU fertilizer industry by 2030, and – looking ahead to 2050 – forecasts the almost complete decarbonization of the industry, via zero-carbon electricity generation in the EU and the growth of renewable hydrogen production. With the right policy & regulatory levers in place, Fertilizers Europe believes there is no reason the transition cannot happen faster.

Article

Closing the Gap for Zero-Emission Fuels

In January 2022, UMAS and the Getting To Zero Coalition (GtZC) released a report with policy options for closing the competitiveness gap between conventional & future maritime fuels. Such measures will be necessary to enable an equitable transition to zero-emissions shipping. So how might these potential policy routes may impact and enable the scaling of maritime ammonia?

Paper

Quantifying the emissions footprint of the nitrogen industry

Understanding and quantifying the emissions footprint of an industry is critical to decarbonisation efforts. Without high quality and standardised data, an industry will continually stall on lowering emissions. But this is quickly changing. Companies are seeking to understand their emissions landscape and benchmark themselves accurately. Many leading companies are setting ambitious emissions reduction targets. But its not just the first movers from whom this data matters. Policy is changing as with emissions trading schemes are rolled out across the world. This will force the laggards into action. CRU has developed readily available standardised data and methodologies to capture emissions across…

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Hinicio & CertifHy

Since 2014, Hinicio is leading CertifHy, the first EU-wide Guarantee of Origin scheme for hydrogen, including a definition for Green Hydrogen and (non-renewable) low-carbon Hydrogen. We will share our experience and provide insights and relevant lessons learned from designing and implementing CertifHy. We will touch upon dealing with multiple primary energies going into a process which might be renewable and non-renewable, and the carbon intensity calculation in multi-input and multi-output plants.

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Towards Global Ammonia Energy Certification Standards

Considerable attention is now being paid to both life-cycle carbon intensity standards and guarantees of origin for many low carbon fuels, including ammonia energy, to ensure that international trade may be facilitated, expedited, and given priority guarantees of market access under long-term supply agreements. Standardisation and certification are crucial to these markets.  Further, the prospect of commanding a “clean/green” market premium, which buyers in markets such as the European Union and East Asia may be prepared to pay for ammonia energy imports, may also set the necessary impulses to stimulate the domestic ammonia energy economies around the world. Certifications can,…